Firstly the expression "biscuit" is an Australian or British term for cookies. The term ANZAC stands for the celebrated Australia and New Zealand Army Corp" of renowned fame throughout World War I and once again during World War II. I can't definitely establish when Anzac Biscuits first came into being but they certainly were a big favourite when we were kids. "Only if you're good will I bake Anzac Biscuits", my mother would say. The reward was well worth behaving for a few hours or, at least until you couldn't eat any more Anzac Biscuits.


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Wednesday, 18-Mar-2015 17:23:38 PDT

ANZAC BISCUITS

WHAT ARE ANZAC BISCUITS?

Firstly the expression "biscuit" is an Australian or British term for cookies. The term ANZAC stands for the celebrated "Australia and New Zealand Army Corp" of renowned fame throughout World War I and once again during World War II.

I can't definitely establish when Anzac Biscuits first came into being but they certainly were a big favourite when we were kids. "Only if you're good will I bake Anzac Biscuits", my mother would say. The reward was well worth behaving for a few hours or, at least until you couldn't eat any more Anzac Biscuits. Be a kid again and enjoy.

LIST OF INGREDIENTS FOR ANZAC BISCUITS RECIPE

You will need for your Anzac Biscuits:

If some of the ingredients for your Anzac Biscuits seem unfamiliar I'll deal with them at the end.

METHOD OF MIXING THE ANZAC BISCUITS RECIPE

Firstly preheat your oven to 160o C [320o F].

Place the "Golden Syrup" and butter in a saucepan over low heat and melt. Take your bicarbonate of soda dissolved in the hot water and add to the butter-syrup mixture.

Now mix the dry ingredients for your anzac biscuits recipe in a bowl. This is the oats, flour, sugar and coconut.

Pour the butter-syrup mixture into the dry ingredients and mix well by hand.

PROCEDURE FOR BAKING THE ANZAC BISCUITS RECIPE

Place tablespoons of the mixture onto lightly greased baking trays. Flatten the mixture out to about 65 - 75 mm [2 1/2 - 3 inches] and leave space in between for spreading. Place in oven and bake for about 8 - 10 minutes or until a deep brown.

Cool down on the baking tray for about 10 minutes and then transfer to a wire cake rack to cool further.

That's it! Not exactly rocket science, but fun and particularly moresome.

DIFFICULT INGREDIENTS IN THE ANZAC BISCUITS RECIPE

For our overseas friends I assume bicarbonate of soda is readily available. The rolled oats are the breakfast variety which are normally boiled and served. I should imagine the desiccated coconut is also widely available being used in numerous cake recipes.

The only difficulty might be "Golden Syrup". I'm not sure this isn't just a peculiarly Australian product which was extensively called "cocky's joy" during the 1930's depression era when it was mixed with boiled wheat as the only form of sustenance. We actually spread it on buttered bread, well my generation does.

"Golden Syrup" is a by-product of sugar refining, a more refined version of molasses with the colour and consistency of honey. No don't even think of substituting. - See feedback below.

That's it and not one spoonful of Vegemite in sight, don't know how we left that out...

FEEDBACK ON THE RECIPE

Jay wrote:

>OK Ian, the first batch of ANZAC biscuits has been made and they are pretty
> good. All of the family like them. In fact, they are excellent with a hot
> cup of coffee. I was surprised at how quickly a batch can be made.

Eaten much faster. With my waist line I'm "barred" from them.

> For "golden syrup", I used a locally (in Alabama) made concoction called
> Golden Eagle Syrup, which I already had in the pantry. It is a "blend of
> corn syrup, cane sugar syrup, cane molasses and pure honey" as stated on the
> label. I use a couple of tablespoons this stuff in my BBQ sauce because it
> is very thick and helps hold the sauce to the meat. I doubt that I will be
> able to find the OZ version of "golden syrup" locally.

Thanks for that, may I include that information on the page?

> I left the cookies out to cool on the cooking sheet and then transferred
> them to a wire rack to finish as you suggested. Are they supposed to be
> crunchy or soft? I was expecting the biscuits to harden as they cooled and
> be crunchy but these are soft. Have I messed up or did I do it as right as
> I could with the ingredients on hand?

Seems to vary but mostly soft. Depends on the composition of the ingredients. Your description sounds like a "five star" rating.

> My best to you!

Ditto

Harry wrote

>I am referring to your" DIFFICULT INGREDIENTS IN THE ANZAC BISCUITS RECIPE"

>Trying to explain Anzac Day ( and the cookies :-) to overseas friends in Holland and Germany, I found that,
>with my German heritage, Golden Syrup, might be subsituted with the German " RUEBENKRAUT" a
>by-product of sugar refining, from Sugarbeets ( RUEBEN ) a version of molasses with the colour of
>Vegemite and consistency of thick honey.

>You might want to add this to your feedback section.

I did, thanks mate.

Now Let me know how YOU go

ANZAC DAY LINKS

ANZAC biscuits: The origin and recipe [Australian War Memorial] - Army issue version AND the popular version.

The ANZAC Day tradition

Commemoration: Anzac Day

ANZAC Day Commemoration Committee (Qld)

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